Watch full video: Serena Mckay video leaked twitter, Woman convicted in killing

Watch full video: Serena Mckay video leaked twitter, Woman convicted in killing

A young woman who is now serving a term for second-degree murder had her plea to have her sentence reduced denied so that she could go back to her Aboriginal village and begin the process of enrolling in the University of Manitoba. The 20-year-old lady was one of two teenagers found guilty in the death of Serena McKay in April 2017; she cannot be named since she was a minor at the time.

NOW WATCH THE COMPLETE VIDEO HERE

NOW WATCH THE COMPLETE VIDEO HERE

NOW WATCH THE COMPLETE VIDEO HERE

At Sagkeeng First Nation, McKay, a 19-year-old high school student, was battered by two classmates and left outside to die. Later, a disturbing video of the incident was posted on social media. At the accused girl’s trial, a pathologist stated that McKay most likely succumbed to hypothermia and was unable to seek protection from the cold because of his wounds and high alcohol levels in his body.

The woman, who asked to be released early, was given a 40-month preventive prison sentence in June 2018 and then another 23.5 months of conditional supervision. During the sentencing hearing for the now-20-year-old woman who was found guilty of murder, Serena McKay, the mother gave a family member a bear hug outside of court. CBC (Jill Kubler)
She was initially sentenced by Provincial Court Judge Rocky Pollack, who also rejected her request for early release. Pollack stated that the woman “still does not comprehend the magnitude of her consequences” in his written decisions from August 26.

NOW WATCH THE COMPLETE VIDEO HERE

NOW WATCH THE COMPLETE VIDEO HERE

NOW WATCH THE COMPLETE VIDEO HERE

He claimed that she made an effort to eliminate harmful influences from her life by severing ties with the father of her 4-year-old boy and a friend who had a little hand in the incidents that resulted in McKay’s murder.

She completed her high school education while incarcerated and has been hailed as a role model for youth centers in Manitoba. Currently employed in the Women’s Correctional Centre’s laundromat, the woman is also active in an ongoing program to support Aboriginal offenders. Headingley is a place for adults. In November, she was moved there.

The 20-year-mother old’s and grandmother, who were there for the entire trial and whom she had seen, would provide the woman with substantial family support, according to the plea for early release.

But Pollack noted that their conduct wasn’t altogether admirable.

She discovered she was getting tattoos, joined a group that disobeyed lockdown instructions, forgeried a youth center employee’s signature to mail a letter, and received a fine for skipping her medicine.

NOW WATCH THE COMPLETE VIDEO HERE

NOW WATCH THE COMPLETE VIDEO HERE

NOW WATCH THE COMPLETE VIDEO HERE

A evaluation by the traditional knowledge custodian at the Women’s Correctional Center revealed that the lady was “struggling with self-acceptance” and “throwing up her ideals,” while a progress report by the probation officer stated that the woman continued to be susceptible to being mislead by others. employed to get others’ acceptance.

Pollack also referred to the woman’s handwritten “Story of My Life” booklet. She described the murderous night in it as follows:

NOW WATCH THE COMPLETE VIDEO HERE

NOW WATCH THE COMPLETE VIDEO HERE

NOW WATCH THE COMPLETE VIDEO HERE

“A few drinks developed into a binge-drinking weekend. The realization that I was a murder suspect when I woke up on Monday was really shocking. I don’t recall much about that weekend, but I remember feeling awful seeing a friend show me the movie. I sat down and said I wasn’t a violent person, denying everything.
In an attempt to disassociate herself from the murder, Pollack claimed that this was not the first time he had read something from her pen. “The activities I participated in should not have ended in this way,” she wrote in a previous statement.
Under no circumstances ought to it be available to the broader public.

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*